PSA from Eversource – Don’t Let Scams Ruin the Holiday Season

PSA from Eversource – Don’t Let Scams Ruin the Holiday Season

Eversource joins other utilities urging caution to customers

MANCHESTER, N.H. (November 18, 2019) — Whether it’s over the phone, online or at the front door, sophisticated scammers are finding unique ways to exploit people and steal their money, and Eversource wants its customers to beware of the seasonal increase in utility scams. These scammers often pose as Eversource employees to get money, demand personal information for identity theft, or use deceptive marketing tactics to convince customers to switch energy suppliers. This week—as part of Utilities United Against Scams, which is a consortium of over 100 energy companies—Eversource is urging its customers to look for the signs of scammers.

“We always want to protect our customers from scams, and that’s why it’s critical we continue to raise awareness and educate the public about all the different tactics these scammers use,” said Eversource Senior Vice President and Chief Customer Officer Penni Conner. “If someone shows up at your home or calls you and demands immediate payment, do NOT give it to them. Call us right away at 1-800-662-7764 to verify ANY request for payment or personal information.”

A common utility con involves customers getting phone calls warning that their service is about to be shut off because of unpaid bills. The caller claims to be a billing representative from Eversource who tells a customer that to avoid an immediate shutoff, they need to settle an overdue bill by providing a credit card number or a prepaid debit card. In many cases, the caller ID will display “Eversource.” Both businesses and homeowners are targeted and, unfortunately, scammers are often successful. According to the Better Business Bureau’s 2018 Scam Tracker Risk Report, the median loss for a utility scam victim is $500.

The energy company wants to remind its customers:

  • Eversource representatives never demand instant payment in person or over the phone.
  • Eversource representatives do not require the use of prepaid debit cards (such as Green Dot MoneyPak, Vanilla or Reloadit).
  • Eversource representatives never request customers meet at a payment center, such as a department or grocery store, to make a payment.
  • Eversource does not solicit door-to-door or on the phone on behalf of third-party energy suppliers.
  • All Eversource employees carry photo identification; field workers wear company logoed clothing and drive company vehicles.

Eversource urges anyone who believes they are a target of improper solicitation to please alert local law enforcement and contact the company directly at 1-800-662-7764. The energy company tracks these types of customer concerns and reports them to state regulators.

Eversource.com and the Utilities United Against Scams websites provide more information on how to protect personal information and avoid becoming a victim of utility scams. Concerned customers can also report scams and fraudulent activity by calling the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission at 603-271-2431.

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Notice of Public Hearing – Appropriation of Unanticipated Funds

Town of Litchfield
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Appropriation of Unanticipated Funds

The Litchfield Board of Selectmen will hold a public hearing in accordance with RSA 31:95-b on Monday, November 25, 2019 at 6:30 PM at the Town Office Meeting Room, 2 Liberty Way, Litchfield, NH for the purpose of receiving public comment concerning the acceptance and expenditure of $68,205.54 for 2020 paving projects and purchase of a wood/brush chipper for the Highway Department. Residents wishing to speak on this matter are invited to attend or residents may send comments by email to: Tbrown@Litchfieldnh.gov or mail to Town of Litchfield, Troy  Brown, Town Administrator, 2 Liberty Way, Litchfield, NH 03052. 

PRESS RELEASE: NH State Register of Historic Places adds eight properties, including five from Litchfield’s town center

Five (5) sites from Litchfield’s town center have been added to the NH State Register of Historic Places.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 5, 2019
Shelly Angers, N.H. Department of Natural & Cultural Resources
603-271-3136
shelly.angers@dncr.nh.gov
Twitter: 
@NHDNCR

NH State Register of Historic Places adds eight properties, including five from Litchfield’s town center

The New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources is pleased to announce that the State Historical Resources Council has added eight properties to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places.

For the first time, five buildings from Litchfield have been added to the register; they are located consecutively next to each other on Route 3A, creating a town center that has served most community functions for generations. The properties include: the Gothic Revival Litchfield Presbyterian Church (1844), Greek Revival Litchfield Town Hall (1851), Tudor Revival Aaron Cutler Memorial Library (1924), Colonial Revival Griffin Memorial School (1930) and the mid-twentieth century Litchfield Fire Station (1958).

Each building has been integral to the development of Litchfield’s identity, contributing to the town’s social fabric by serving as places for community gatherings, celebrations, education and more.

Three other properties were also recently listed to New Hampshire’s State Register:

George Burrell’s Residence in Keene includes an 1853 predominantly brick Italianate-style house that has wooden double doors with stained glass for the front entry, a full bay window on the front and arched windows below the gable. Its detached Stick-style carriage house is also architecturally significant. The property is located on Washington Street, which is known for its 19th-century homes in a variety of styles. 

The one-story Willing Workers Hall in Warren has served as the social hall for the local Willing Workers charitable organization from the time that it was built for that purpose in 1915. The building has two primary spaces inside: an auditorium that includes a stage, and a kitchen that still has a large cookstove, original cupboards and tin farmer’s sink.

Westmoreland’s Federal-style Brick Church was built in 1838 soon after an earlier church was burned under suspicious circumstances. Constructed primarily of locally made brick, it has a clapboarded gable-front pediment, two wood-paneled entry doors with large windows above them and a two-tiered square bell tower.

Anyone wishing to nominate a property to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places must research the history of the nominated property and document it on an individual inventory form from the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. Having a property listed in the Register does not impose restrictions on property owners. For more information, visitnh.gov/nhdhr.

New Hampshire’s Division of Historical Resources, the State Historic Preservation Office, was established in 1974 and is part of the NH Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. NHDHR’s mission is to preserve and celebrate New Hampshire’s irreplaceable historic resources through programs and services that provide education, stewardship, and protection. For more information, visit us online at nh.gov/nhdhr or by calling 603-271-3483.

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